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Detailed Course Descriptions


 

AG 7310 Agriculture and Sustainable Aquatic Resources. (3-0) Study of the impacts of agricultural on aquatic resources, including agricultural water requirements for various types of crops and soils, impacts of agricultural chemicals on aquatic ecosystems, efficiency of alternative irrigation practices, and means for altering or mitigating current practices that can adversely affect aquatic resources.

BIO 7100 Professional Development. (1-0) This course is seminar-based and covers topics related to teaching, research, and employment responsibilities. Completion of the course is required as a condition of employment for graduate assistants. This course does not earn graduate degree credit. Repeatable with different emphasis. Graded on a credit (CR), no-credit (F) basis.

BIO 7102 Seminar in Aquatic Resources. (1-0) Interactive discussion of timely issues and problems, designed to introduce students to the range of scientific, socioeconomic and policy issues likely to be encountered within the field of aquatic resources. All students seeking a doctoral degree in Aquatic Resources must enroll in BIO 7102 at least twice.

BIO 7114 Collaborative Research. (1-1) This course (concurrent enrollment allowed) allows Ph.D. level graduate students to initiate, conduct, and participate in collaborative research with graduate faculty of the Department of Biology that is in addition to research conducted under BIO 7303, 7399A, or 7699A. This course recognizes the collaborative nature of scientific investigation.

BIO 7120 Population Biology Seminar. (1-0) This course facilitates exploration of current topics in population and conservation biology through reading and discussion of contemporary primary and secondary literature.

BIO 7214 Collaborative Research. (2-2) This course (concurrent enrollment allowed) allows Ph.D. level graduate students to initiate, conduct, and participate in collaborative research with graduate faculty of the Department of Biology that is in addition to research conducted under BIO 7303, 7399A, or 7699A. This course recognizes the collaborative nature of scientific investigation.

BIO 7302 Problems in Aquatic Resources. (3-0) Individual study on specific state, national, or international aquatic resources issues, under direct supervision of a doctoral or associate faculty member. Students may not enroll in BIO 7302 more than twice for doctoral credit without the approval of the Graduate Program Director.

BIO 7303 Research. (3-3) Research course for students who have not yet passed their Candidacy Exam, typically under direction of research-dissertation supervisor. Pre-candidacy students must enroll in course every semester until admission to Candidacy, although it may not be taken more than three times for doctoral credit without the approval of Graduate Program Director.

BIO 7308 History of Vegetation and Climate. (3-1) An overview of past vegetation and its relationship to changing climate. Topics include principles of paleovegetation analysis, paleoclimatology, the rise of flowering plants, vegetation during the age of dinosaurs, the rise of the grasslands, and the Quaternary Ice Age. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

BIO 7310 Global Aquatic Resources. (3-0) Introduction to global, national, and regional aquatic resource issues, including scientific, environmental policy and socioeconomic components and perspectives. Water quantity and quality issues and their root causes in different regions of the world are examined, with an emphasis on case studies.

BIO 7312 Government Policy and Aquatic Resources. (3-0) Examination of aquatic resources issues in federal, state, or local governments, including examination of goals and relations of different governmental entities to each other. Relevant international treaties, and federal and state statutes in which these policies are embodied, are examined.

BIO 7314 Collaborative Research. (3-3) This course (concurrent enrollment allowed) allows Ph.D. level graduate students to initiate, conduct, and participate in collaborative research with graduate faculty of the Department of Biology that is in addition to research conducted under BIO 7303, 7399A, or 7699A. This course recognizes the collaborative nature of scientific investigation.

BIO 7322 Scientific Method and Aquatic Resources. (3-0) Analysis of the scientific method applied to ecological research, focusing on aquatic ecosystems. Topics include methods of reasoning and statistical inferences in research, strategies of scientific research in aquatic ecology, and scientific research as a social process.

BIO 7324 Natural History and Conservation of Large Mammals. (3-0) This course will introduce students to advanced details of natural history, research, and conservation of large mammals. Topics considered will include natural history, range and population status (historic and current), importance to and interaction with humans, research design and analysis, and the development of conservation and management plans.

BIO 7325 Wildlife and Recreation: Impact and Management. (3-0) Introduction to the impacts of human recreational activities on wildlife habitats and populations. Management practices to enhance human-wildlife encounters or to minimize detrimental effects on wildlife populations are presented. Prerequisites: BIO 5423 and BIO 5435, or consent of instructor.

BIO 7328 Integrated Waterbird Management. (3-0) This course examines the principles and practical methodology of integrated waterbird conservation and management, including overview of waterbird ecology, techniques in monitoring and data collection related to population dynamics, and habitat parameters of waterbird species. Field trips may be required.

BIO 7336 Evolutionary Ecology. (3-0) This course will use an evolutionary perspective to explore questions provided by natural selection and sexual selection through assessment of current theory and research related to topics such as competition, coevolution, and phenotypic plasticity. Students will achieve comprehension and familiarity with the field through discussions and writing.

BIO 7346 Conservation Biology. (3-0) Examination of the alteration of habitats and associated biological changes threatening the continued existence of species and basic ecosystems. Topics include conservation ethics, working paradigms, levels and loss of global biodiversity, conservation at population and ecosystem levels, restoration ecology, endangered species biology and conservation laws. Recent Advances are stressed.

BIO 7348 Aquatic Resources Economics. (3-0) Examination of economic and related social issues for facilitation of sustainable aquatic resources for competing beneficial human uses and ecosystem maintenance, including valuation of aquatic ecosystem services. Prerequisite: BIO 7312 or consent of instructor.

BIO 7350 Aquatic Resources Law. (3-0) Examination of treaties, state and federal laws, and regional and local regulations, affecting freshwater and coastal aquatic resources. The focus is on aquatic ecosystems, water quantity and quality and environmental conditions, including the availability, storage, use, and protection of aquatic resources. Prerequisite: BIO 7312 or consent of instructor.

BIO 7353 Biogeography. (3-1) Examines historical and ecological explanations of the geographic distribution of organisms including the role of geologic, climatic, and biologic changes. Emphasizes the historical and philosophical development of the science and modern methods of analysis. Prerequisites: Undergraduate evolution and ecology courses, or consent of instructor.

BIO 7355 Plant-Water Relations. (3-0) Examination of the physiology and ecology of water use in higher plants, including the uptake, utilization, and movement of water, transpiration and adaptation to variable water availability including drought, and the ecological role of water in structuring plant communities. Prerequisite: BIO 3465 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

BIO 7356 Pollution of Aquatic Ecosystems. (3-0) Overview of the water quality degradation of aquatic ecosystems (rivers, lakes, wetlands, groundwater aquifers) and their living resources from point and nonpoint pollutant sources. Topics will include aquatic ecosystem pollution and impacts attributable to nutrients, heavy metals, organic chemicals, sediment, salinization, and acid rain. Field trips may be required.

BIO 7360 Special Topics in Aquatic Resources. (3-0) Examination of current or emerging state, national and international aquatic resources issues, including root causes and their human and ecosystem implications. The course may be repeated for credit, depending on the topic. No more than six hours can be counted for doctoral credit without the approval of the Graduate Program Director.

BIO 7360A Industry and Sustainable Aquatic Resources. (3-0) Examination of industrial water needs and uses, the types and quantities of water pollutants produced by different industries, problems faced by industry regarding process water for different manufacturing activities, and the possibilities for industry to contribute to the goal of sustainable aquatic resources.

BIO 7360B Environmental Linkages and Sustainable Aquatic Resources. (3-0) Introduction to the environmental relationships between humans and other living beings and the ecological systems in which they exist. Emphasis will be on the potential for individual environmental problems to have serious impacts on other environmental components, as well as the nature of these impacts.

BIO 7360N Behavioral Ecology. (3-0) Examination of evolutionary implications of behavioral interactions through the assessment of current theory and research related to cooperation and conflict, mating and parental conflict and sexual selection. Class will consist of lectures, discussions of recent primary literature, and scientific writing.

BIO 7360P Special Topics in Aquatic Resources: Regulation of Plant Growth and Development. (3-0) Examination of current or emerging state, national and international aquatic resources issues, including root causes and their human and ecosystem interactions. The course may be repeated for credit, depending on the topic. No more than six hours can be counted for doctoral credit without the approval of the Program Director.

BIO 7360Q Special Topics in Aquatic Resources: Spatial Ecology of Animals. (3-0) Examination of current or emerging state, national and international aquatic resources issues, including root causes and their human and ecosystem interactions. The course maybe repeated for credit, depending on the topic. No more than six hours can be counted for doctoral credit without the approval of the Program Director.

BIO 7360R Special Topics in Aquatic Resources: Community and Ecosystem Ecology. (3-0) Examination of current or emerging state, national and international aquatic resources issues, including root causes and their human and ecosystem interactions. The course may be repeated for credit, depending on the topic. No more than six hours can be counted for doctoral credit without the approval of the Program Director.

BIO 7362 Environmental Impact Analysis. (3-0) Examination of government regulations regarding environmental impact, content of environmental impact statements, procedure for impact studies, application of ecological principles to impact studies, and the review process for environmental impact statements, focusing on aquatic resources.

BIO 7366 Integrated Water Resources Management. (3-0) Study of principles for integrated management of aquatic ecosystems, including drainage basin, regional, and transboundary dimensions. Other global issues (climate change, biodiversity, etc.) also are discussed as components of integrative approach for multi-functional programs for sustainable use of aquatic ecosystems. Prerequisites: BIO 7310 and 7412 or consent of instructor.

BIO 7367 Behavioral Ecology. (3-0) Examination of the evolutionary implications of behavioral interactions through the assessment of current theory and research related to social behavior, sexual selection and sexual conflict, and mechanisms of behavior. Students will achieve comprehension and familiarity with the historical development of the field of behavioral ecology through discussions and writing.

BIO 7368 Introduction to Ecological Modeling. (3-0) Mathematical models range from simple conceptual models to complex mechanistic models for mimicking behavior of natural systems. This course provides knowledge regarding the quality of modeling studies, including modeling assumptions and quality of input data, and practical skills needed to conduct modeling projects. Knowledge of calculus recommended. Computer applications emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 2471/2472 or consent of instructor.

BIO 7399A Dissertation. (3-5) Original research and writing in Aquatic Resources, to be accomplished under direct supervision of the dissertation advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each semester (including summer) for at least three dissertation hours. Graded on a credit (CR), progress (PR), no-credit (F) basis.

BIO 7401 Assessment Techniques for Aquatic Resources. (3-3) The rationale for designing and implementing monitoring and sampling programs for aquatic resources is examined. General field and laboratory methods for assessing water quantity, water quantity and the status of aquatic ecosystems and their living resources, will be introduced. Field trips will be required.

BIO 7402 Molecular Field Techniques. (2-3) The application of molecular tools for identifying, quantifying, and interpreting biological diversity assessments in aquatic systems. The course focuses on micro organismal identification and vertebrate model systems.

BIO 7405 Statistics and Experimental Design I. (3-0) Introduction to inferential statistics, including exploratory and confirmatory data analysis, estimation and hypothesis testing, analysis of variance and regression, and non-parametric techniques, as applied to aquatic resource issues. Computer applications emphasized.

BIO 7406 Statistics and Experimental Design II. (3-0) Introduction to the principles of experimental design, including randomization, replication, sample-size determination, completely randomized and randomized block design, factorial design, repeated measure design, and analysis of variance and covariance, as applied to aquatic resource issues. Computer applications emphasized. Prerequisite: BIO 7405 or consent of instructor.

BIO 7407 Instrumentation for Water Quality Analysis. (3-3) An introduction to the theory and application of laboratory and field instrumentation and techniques for analysis of water quality. Prerequisite: CHEM 3410 or consent of instructor.

BIO 7408 Fish Ecology and Conservation. (3-3) Examination of the linkages and interactions between fish assemblages and communities and their population ecology. Issues related to flowing and pooled water systems and fisheries conservation also are discussed. Field trips may be required.

BIO 7410 Aquatic Microbial Ecology. (3-3) Examination of microbial organisms, communities, and interactions affecting the form, structure, and functional aspects of aquatic ecosystems. Field trips may be required. Prerequisite: BIO 2400/3440 (Microbiology) or consent of instructor.

BIO 7412 Environmental Hydrology. (3-3) Overview of the properties, distribution, and movement of water over and under the land surface and its relation to sustainable aquatic ecosystems, including quantitative methods to assess cumulative impacts of human activities on such systems. Field trips may be required. Knowledge of calculus recommended.

BIO 7415 Ichthyology. (3-3) An introduction to the morphology, taxonomy, natural history, and evolution of fishes. Field trips will be made to collect specimens, and laboratory periods will be devoted to morphological and systematic analyses. Prerequisite: Biology undergraduate zoology course or consent of instructor.

BIO 7419 Stream Ecology. (3-3) Study of ecological theories, concepts, and processes occurring at the population, community, and ecosystem levels of organization in running water. Laboratory includes sampling methods, descriptive and comparative studies, experiments, and critical discussion of literature. Field trips may be required.

BIO 7421 Landscape Dynamics. (3-3) Study of processes influencing energy and material flows, interactions and cycling in aquatic ecosystems, including system and spatial analysis of landscapes, aquatic ecosystems, land use characteristics, and associated human impacts. Field trips may be required. Knowledge of calculus recommended. Prerequisite: BIO 7412 or consent of instructor.

BIO 7422 Wetlands Ecology. (3-3) Study of the characteristics, classification, conservation and management of marshes and other periodically-inundated ecosystems, emphasizing the interactions of physical, chemical and biological factors. Field trips may be required. Prerequisite: BIO 4416 or consent of instructor.

BIO 7424 Phycology. (3-3) Examination of algae (phytoplankton, periphyton) and their structure, taxonomy, ecology and distribution.

BIO 7426 Ecology and Management of Aquatic Macrophytes. (3-3) Examination of aquatic macrophytes and their ecology, taxonomy, distribution and management. Field trips may be required.

BIO 7427 Principles of Population Biology I. (3-3) Provides a foundation in theory and mathematics of basic population biology. The course is divided into modular components including defining evolutionary significant units, ecology of populations, genetics of populations, and evolutionary genetics. Prerequisites: BIO 4416 and 2450, or permission of instructor.

BIO 7428 Principles of Population Biology II. (3-3) Provides a foundation in theory and mathematics of basic population biology. The course is divided into modular components which include: 1) Ecology of Communities, 2) Evolution of Behavior, 3) Phylogenic Methods, and 4) Biological Diversity and Conservation Biology. Prerequisite: BIO 7427 or permission of instructor.

BIO 7433 Population Genetics. (3-2) This course examines the theoretical foundations of population genetics, including the description of population genetic structure and the forces creating it. The course emphasizes application of principles to a wide range of current problems in evolution, systematics and ecology. Molecular methods, data interpretation and computer-based data analysis are emphasized.

BIO 7434 Herpetology. (3-3) A course treating the origin and evolution of amphibians and reptiles; their reproductive and physiological tactics; taxonomy/systematics; and population biology. While cosmopolitan in scope, emphasis will be placed on North American species and those groups inhabiting Texas.

BIO 7440 Aquatic Toxicology. (3-3) Introduction to principles for identifying and assessing the adverse effects of chemicals and other compounds and mixtures on aquatic organisms and ecosystems. Completion of BIO 7402 is recommended prior to enrollment in BIO 7440.

BIO 7447 Microbial Physiology and Genetics. (3-3) Prokaryotes, including bacteria and archaea, are the most diverse group of organisms on earth. Many prokaryotes live in environments which are inhospitable to other life forms. This course covers major aspects of prokaryotic physiology and genetics that permit them to be so successful. Prerequisites: BIO 2400 and 2450 or equivalents.

BIO 7466 Phylogenetics. (2-3) Study of the use of phylogenetic methodologies in aquatic research, including practical data collection, management, and analysis in the reconstruction of phylogenies. Laboratory exercises will introduce phylogenetic and DNA analysis software. Prerequisite: BIO 2450, 4369 and 5466, or consent of instructor.

BIO 7468 Groundwater Resources. (3-3) Study of the geological, physical, chemical and biological factors influencing sustainable groundwater resources, including hydrologic linkages and interactions with surface aquatic resources. Emphasis will be on the karst aquifer systems of Central Texas, and other groundwater aquifer systems of the United States.

BIO 7470 Limnology. (3-3) Physical, chemical, and biological factors affecting productivity in lakes, ponds, and streams. Limnology sampling methods, chemical and biological analysis of samples, and hydrographic surveying are included in the laboratory. Prerequisite: One year of chemistry or consent of instructor.

BIO 7471 Reservoir Ecology. (3-3) Study of the physical, geological, chemical, and biological factors that influence and form structural and functional aspects of reservoir ecosystems. Lab focuses on field, laboratory, and mathematical approaches to quantifying and managing these important ecosystems. Field trips may be required. Prerequisite: Biology 4470 or 5470 or consent of instructor.

BIO 7475 Restoration of Polluted Aquatic Resources. (3-3) Overview of methods for treating or restoring aquatic resources degraded by pollution and related anthropogenic impacts. Topics include point and nonpoint source pollution of surface waters and groundwater aquifers, pollution from storage and waste disposal sites, aquatic habitat rehabilitation, and on-site methods. Field trips may be required. Prerequisite: BIO 7356 or consent of instructor.

BIO 7699A Dissertation. (6-10) Original research and writing in Aquatic Resources, to be accomplished under direct supervision of the dissertation advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each semester (including summer) for at least three dissertation hours. Graded on a credit (CR), progress (PR), no-credit (F) basis.

CHEM 7330 Environmental Chemistry. (3-0) An introduction to environmental chemistry, with an emphasis on aquatic resources. Basic principles of geochemistry and atmospheric chemistry, as they relate to pollutant impacts on aquatic ecosystems, also will be examined. Prerequisites: CHEM 1341/1141, CHEM 1342/1142, CHEM 2341/2141, CHEM 2342/2142 and CHEM 3410, or consent of instructor.

ENG 7314 Specializations in Professional and Technical Communication Topics: Writing and Communicating about Aquatic Resources Issues. (3-0) Provides theoretical and practical information for specialized types of technical and professional communication.

GEO 7316 Remote Sensing and the Environment. (3-0) A detailed examination and implementation of sophisticated approaches for processing satellite digital images with emphasis on environmental applications.

GEO 7318 GIS and Environmental Geography. (3-0) This course examines the nature of environmental problems and exploration of the potential of GIS for environmental modeling and management. The conceptual basis for using GIS as well as the framing of environmental research problems will be covered.

GEO 7334 Geographic Aspects of Water. (3-0) This seminar is a critical analysis of developmental and current literature that defines water's critical role in determining the physical and cultural characteristics of the earth. Principal focus will be placed on water's role on land use and as a critical resource.

HR 7375 Aquatic Health Ecology and Human Disease. (3-0) Introduction to the health consequences of human-environment interaction and aquatic pollution. Topics to include bacterial and toxic aquatic agents and their relation to human disease. Control of communicable and noninfectious diseases from water resources, and epidemiological principles important to research in waterborne human disease, will be examined.

PHIL 7323 Environmental Ethics and Sustainable Aquatic Resources. (3-0) Examination of the ethical implications of environmental use and management policies and practices, with emphasis on sustainable aquatic resources.

POSI 7310 Resolution of Disputes Involving Aquatic Resources. (3-0) Analysis of historically significant environmental disputes affecting aquatic resources and establishing precedents for resolution subsequent disputes. Techniques for resolving environmental disputes (e.g., litigation, arbitration, mediation, negotiation) and how science and scientists are used in each procedure. Design of systems for using dispute resolution procedures in appropriate sequence.